International Women’s Day: UN Trade Chief Rebeca Grynspan Urges Move from Recognition to Action


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UNCTAD/PRESS/PR/2022/002
International Women’s Day: UN Trade Chief Rebeca Grynspan Urges Move from Recognition to Action

Geneva, Switzerland, 8 marzo 2022

On International Women’s Day on 8 March, Rebeca Grynspan, the first woman secretary-general of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), urged the world to “move from recognition to action” on gender equality. Watch her video message.

“Women’s leadership is especially important in these times of crisis. Because a crisis is never gender neutral. And COVID-19 is no exception.”

“It’s not enough to change the narrative on women in trade. It’s not enough to recognize the different ways trade affects women and men. We must move from recognition to action.”

She said UNCTAD would do so through activities to ensure more women benefit from the global economy, more cross-cutting gender statistics in its flagship reports and stronger consensus-building on issues at the top of the trade and gender agenda, among other actions.

UNCTAD promotes gender mainstreaming as a key element to achieving inclusive and sustainable development through the eTrade for Women initiative, trade and gender development programme, the young female scientist programme and the “Ring the Bell for Gender Equality” project of its Sustainable Stock Exchanges initiative, among others.

To mark this year’s International Women’s Day, UNCTAD will launch a study on mainstreaming gender in national policies, bringing together policymakers and experts from different developing countries to share policy experiences in this area.

More material from UNCTAD on International Women’s Day is available here.

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About UNCTAD

UNCTAD is the UN trade and development body. It supports developing countries to access the benefits of a globalized economy more fairly and effectively and equips them to deal with the potential drawbacks of greater economic integration.

It provides analysis, facilitates consensus-building and offers technical assistance to help developing countries use trade, investment, finance and technology as vehicles for inclusive and sustainable development.